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Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austro-Hungary Railway Carriage(1910)

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Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austro-Hungary Railway Carriage(1910)

Olpas Moravia S.R.O. of Krnov in the Czech Republic under their Managing Director have turned out one of the most magnificent pieces of restoration of a railway carriage anywhere. Under their managing director Jaromir Foltyn they have done a superb job. This is the private railway carriage of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austro-Hungary Railway Carriage(1910)

The coach is currently en route to the railway exhibition at the Dutch railway museum at Utrecht in the Netherlands which will be opened by Queen Beatrix at 3 pm. on April 14, 2010. After September 5, 2010 the coach returns to the National Technical Museum in Prague.

The Exibition is entitled "Royal Class, regal journeys". The Queen will arrive at the museum in the royal train, which will then be put on display. The exhibition - which will be open to the public from 15 April to 5 September - gives the public a chance to view the railway carriages used by the various royal houses.

The Dutch Railway Museum was reopened in 2005 after major renovation, and this exhibition marks its 5th anniversary. For the first time ever, historical royal trains from all over Europe can be seen in a single exhibition. After a regal reception in the Royal Waiting Room, visitors will be led past the gleaming royal carriages by actors dressed as historic figures who will explain the connection between royalty and the railways.

Museums all over Europe have lent exhibits to the Railway Museum. Visitors can admire a carriage used by the British Queen Adelaide (1842), a complete train built for the Portuguese Queen Maria Pia (1858), a panel from the royal train used by the Austrian Empress Sissi (1858), furnishings from Bavarian King Ludwig II's royal train (1860), the interior of Czar Alexander II's carriage (1870), and carriages used by King Christiaan IX of Denmark (1871), King Edward VII of Britain (1902), Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austro-Hungary (1910), King Albert I of Belgium (1912), Swedish King Carl Gustav (1930) and King Boris of Bulgaria (1938).

The carriages used by Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard and the present-day carriage used by Queen Beatrix will be open to the public. In addition, the Railway Museum is building a replica of the saloon car originally built in 1864 for Queen Anna Paulowna.



















































The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg on 28 June 1914 in Bosnia-Herzegovina (then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire) brought the tensions between Austria-Hungary and Serbia to a head. This triggered a chain of international events that embroiled Russia and the major European powers. War broke out in Europe over the next thirty-seven days.

Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife Princess Sophie Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg were in Sarajevo, Serbia, on business. They had come to inspect the troops, and as it was their anniversary and Sophie rarely came with Franz, he had decided to bring her along. She was pregnant at the time with his forth child. They were being driven along in a procession. The Black Hand Movement were planning an assassination of the Archduke and anyone who got in the way. Several men were positioned along Appel Quay, armed with pistols and grenades. Each man also carried a shot of cyanide for suicide after their attack. But the first two men failed to act, and the cars drove past unharmed. However as they reached the Cumurja Bridge, the next assassin, Cabrinovic, threw his grenade, swallowed his poison and jumped into the river. Unfortunately for him, the cyanide was old and merely caused him to throw up, and the river was only a few feet deep. He was retrieved by the police and arrested - he later died of Tubercolosis. Luckily the Archduke saw the grenade coming and managed to bat it away with his hand. It exploded behind them, injuring and killing others. The car drove on, but the other waiting assassins, hearing the explosion, had assumed Franz was dead. When the car passed each of them, they were too stunned to act. Franz Ferdinand arranged a new plan after the attack - they would visit those hurt by the bomb, before returning to Austria, because he was displeased and worried about the earlier bombing.

When their driver mistakenly turned right into Franz Joseph Street, 19 year-old Serbian and member of the Black Hand Gavrilo Princip, who had gone to get lunch after the failed bombing, happened to be standing on the corner. He had just come out of Schillers Store and Delicastessen and was still armed from the earlier plan. He was one of six assassins previously positioned along the route by Danilo Ilić, a leader in the secret radical organization, Black Hand. When the driver stopped to reverse back on to Appel Quay, Princip fired his pistol at the car. The first bullet hit Franz Ferdinand in the neck, piercing his jugular vein and lodging in his spine. The second bullet was aimed at a servant, but it penetrated the side of the car and hit Sophie in the abdomen. Sophie died in Franz Ferdinand's arms and he died shortly afterwards - both wounds were fatal despite the fact the Archduke was wearing a bullet proof vest.

The political objective of the assassination was to break the Austro-Hungarian south-Slav provinces off from the Austro-Hungarian Empire so they could be combined into a Greater Serbia or a Yugoslavia. The assassins' motives were consistent with the movement that later became known as Young Bosnia. The assassins did not work alone. They were supported by an "underground railroad" of Serbian civilians and military officers that provided transportation and hid them; and members of the Serbian military that trained them, encouraged them, and provided weapons, maps, and other information.

After the assassination, the assassins, the key members of the underground railroad, and the key Serbian military conspirators that were still alive were arrested, tried, convicted and punished. Those who were arrested in Bosnia-Herzegovina were tried in Sarajevo in October 1914. The other conspirators were arrested and tried before a Serbian kangaroo court in French-occupied Salonika (Thessaloniki) in 1916–1917 on unrelated false charges[citation needed]. Serbia executed the top three military conspirators

Updated April 11, 2010.